October 18, 2014   162,959 notes

(Source: firstgingerdoctor, via swimrun401)

October 18, 2014   180 notes

magictransistor:

Детская литература

(Source: expositions.nlr.ru)

October 17, 2014   4 notes
October 15, 2014   378 notes

huntingtonlibrary:

So hey, remember our Corpse Flower? Yeah, it’s fruiting now.

(And no, you can’t eat the fruit. Unless you’re a hornbill.)

October 4, 2014   224 notes

erikkwakkel:

I found a rare medieval bookmark in Leiden University Library - In this 4 minute movie I explain how it works and how it is telling for 13th-century reading culture. Hope you like it!

(Source: youtube.com)

October 4, 2014   90 notes
books0977:

Intérieur, Hesnes, Norvége (1925). Albert Marquet (French, 1875-1947). Oil on canvas.
In 1925, Marquet traveled to Norway where the clarity of the Northern light complemented his mature Fauve style. Marquet captures a charming interior, with a glimpse of the lush green landscape of Hesnes seen through the window. The artist’s painterly, gestured brushwork punctuates the brightly patterned interior. This vibrant composition is certainly influenced by the 1920s oils that Matisse so famously produced in Nice.

books0977:

Intérieur, Hesnes, Norvége (1925). Albert Marquet (French, 1875-1947). Oil on canvas.

In 1925, Marquet traveled to Norway where the clarity of the Northern light complemented his mature Fauve style. Marquet captures a charming interior, with a glimpse of the lush green landscape of Hesnes seen through the window. The artist’s painterly, gestured brushwork punctuates the brightly patterned interior. This vibrant composition is certainly influenced by the 1920s oils that Matisse so famously produced in Nice.

(via proseandpassion)

October 4, 2014   19,430 notes
femalegaze:

schmurple:

think-progress:

Arizona Professor Offers Extra Credit To Female Students Who Stop Shaving Their Armpits

Professor Breanne Fahs offers female students extra-credit if they “stop shaving their legs and underarms for ten weeks during the semester while keeping a journal to document their experiences.” For Fahs, who teaches women and gender studies, the purpose is to get students thinking critically about societal norms and gender roles.A similar opportunity is available to men in Fahs’ classes who recieve extra credit for shaving all of their hair from the neck down.One student, Stephanie Robinson, described it as a “life-changing experience:"Many of my friends didn’t want to work out next to me or hear about the assignment, and my mother was distraught at the idea that I would be getting married in a white dress with armpit hair. I also noticed the looks on faces of strangers and people around campus who seemed utterly disgusted by my body hair. It definitely made me realize that if you’re not strictly adhering to socially prescribed gender roles, your body becomes a site for contestation and public opinion."

They published a paper about this the first time someone did it, and it showed that non-white young women experienced a lot more pressure from friends and relatives to remove their hair. The authors suggested that because beauty standards are white - long, fine, flowy blonde hair, blue eyes, etc, etc - his body hair non-conformity was more troubling in women of colour, as they crossed yet another boundary of femininity. They were also more likely to have darker or thicker body hair, so it would stand out more than on the blonde women, for example. For me that sort of exemplifies why it’s so important to have multiple, intersectional feminisms. Because “let’s not shave our legs!” might be a powerful and important message, but it’s ultimately one of white privilege that sort of ignores the whiteness of these beauty standards in the first place.

femalegaze:

schmurple:

think-progress:

Arizona Professor Offers Extra Credit To Female Students Who Stop Shaving Their Armpits

Professor Breanne Fahs offers female students extra-credit if they “stop shaving their legs and underarms for ten weeks during the semester while keeping a journal to document their experiences.” For Fahs, who teaches women and gender studies, the purpose is to get students thinking critically about societal norms and gender roles.
A similar opportunity is available to men in Fahs’ classes who recieve extra credit for shaving all of their hair from the neck down.
One student, Stephanie Robinson, described it as a “life-changing experience:
"Many of my friends didn’t want to work out next to me or hear about the assignment, and my mother was distraught at the idea that I would be getting married in a white dress with armpit hair. I also noticed the looks on faces of strangers and people around campus who seemed utterly disgusted by my body hair. It definitely made me realize that if you’re not strictly adhering to socially prescribed gender roles, your body becomes a site for contestation and public opinion."

They published a paper about this the first time someone did it, and it showed that non-white young women experienced a lot more pressure from friends and relatives to remove their hair. The authors suggested that because beauty standards are white - long, fine, flowy blonde hair, blue eyes, etc, etc - his body hair non-conformity was more troubling in women of colour, as they crossed yet another boundary of femininity. They were also more likely to have darker or thicker body hair, so it would stand out more than on the blonde women, for example. 

For me that sort of exemplifies why it’s so important to have multiple, intersectional feminisms. Because “let’s not shave our legs!” might be a powerful and important message, but it’s ultimately one of white privilege that sort of ignores the whiteness of these beauty standards in the first place.

(via gloomyvixen)

September 20, 2014   974 notes

erikkwakkel:

The splendor of Strahov Library

I am typing this while looking at the building where these images were taken: the library of Strahov Abbey, towering high above Prague. While the monastery was established in 1143, the library dates from 1720. It is one of the most impressive I have visited: thousands of books placed in what looks more like a museum than a library. I hope you get a sense of the atmosphere from these images.

Pics (my own): Strahov Abbey Library, Prague.

September 18, 2014   52,885 notes

theoldsmelly:

my-wanton-self:

I used my fists in a scientific fashion this very morning …. and it felt good. I guess you could say I too, am noted for my athletic powers.

fat-bottom-girls

(Source: paperspast.natlib.govt.nz, via fat-bottom-girls)

September 18, 2014   3,206 notes

ancientart:

Foundation plaques B (photo 1) and A (photo 2), dating to the early 4th century BCE. Both these plaques of hammered gold have been inscribed in Old Persian, and are from Iran during the Achaemenid period.

Artefacts courtesy of the Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio, USA. Photos taken by Daderot via the Wiki Commons.

(via bookporn)