July 17, 2014   7,886 notes

by incidentalcomics:
Behind Every Great Novelist (Illustration for the NY Times Book Review)

by incidentalcomics:

Behind Every Great Novelist (Illustration for the NY Times Book Review)

(via proseandpassion)

July 9, 2014   551 notes
tsmskimonodrome:

Emperor Meiji before his adoption of Western dress, wearing the traditional court robes that all emperors wore since the Heian Period (793-1186 ad) 

Fashion!!!

tsmskimonodrome:

Emperor Meiji before his adoption of Western dress, wearing the traditional court robes that all emperors wore since the Heian Period (793-1186 ad)

Fashion!!!

(via oxane)

June 28, 2014   89 notes

Italian monk wearing funeral mask 1892
via transparentoctopus

Italian monk wearing funeral mask 1892

via transparentoctopus

(via quienesesachica)

June 28, 2014   3,617 notes

Generations - 1925 (c) Ogawa Gesshu
via zoebalthus

Generations - 1925 (c) Ogawa Gesshu

via zoebalthus

(via quienesesachica)

June 16, 2014
June 6, 2014   3 notes

nuits-eclectiques:

Konstantin Razumov

June 5, 2014   290 notes
erikkwakkel:

Premodern 3D design
It may be hard to believe, but this illustration is over 400 years old. It’s from the age of the Renaissance, when folks loved perfect shapes and measurements. They enjoyed experimenting with geometry, but also with perception - and deception, for that matter. And so illustrations like this were produced: perfect three-dimensional designs in a two-dimensional space (the page). This one is part of a book with 97 drawings made by Lorenz Stör, a late-16th-century designer with a love for geometrical designs that resemble the style of Escher. I love how Stör gives us the impression that we can just grab these objects from the page and toss them around.
Pic: Cambridge, Harvard, Houghton Library, MS Type 108 (more here). Here are more designs by Stör.

erikkwakkel:

Premodern 3D design

It may be hard to believe, but this illustration is over 400 years old. It’s from the age of the Renaissance, when folks loved perfect shapes and measurements. They enjoyed experimenting with geometry, but also with perception - and deception, for that matter. And so illustrations like this were produced: perfect three-dimensional designs in a two-dimensional space (the page). This one is part of a book with 97 drawings made by Lorenz Stör, a late-16th-century designer with a love for geometrical designs that resemble the style of Escher. I love how Stör gives us the impression that we can just grab these objects from the page and toss them around.

Pic: Cambridge, Harvard, Houghton Library, MS Type 108 (more here). Here are more designs by Stör.

May 31, 2014   4,135 notes

by Janet Hill

(Source: sosuperawesome, via bookporn)

May 30, 2014   1,480 notes
untrustyou:

Amanda Jasnowski

untrustyou:

Amanda Jasnowski

(via oxane)

May 28, 2014   171,098 notes

(Source: unamusedsloth, via quienesesachica)